How to stop Comcast from turning my wireless router into a public WiFi hotspot?

jackson

Apparently Comcast has decided to piggyback public hotspots onto their customers’ private wireless routers. I have no desire for my router to become a zombie hotspot. Frankly, I feel like they should pay me for the privilege just like they extorted from Netflix if they want to use my house and equipment for their own purposes. Plus, won’t sharing my bandwidth come at a cost to my own upload and download speeds?

Topic: Networking
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
MrsMith
Vote Up (3)

You can opt out, but while I understand your reaction, in some ways I don’t think there is too much to be upset about here. What I don’t like is Comcast charging customers for the hardware (and charging them dearly), then using the customer’s hardware for their own purposes. That’s more of a philosophical problem that a functional one though. One legitimate area of concern is that this is going to cause signal clutter, especially in areas of high density housing. This could cause performance degradation. There are only so many wireless channels, and these are going to be overlapping in urban environments and apartments, especially since in many Comcast markets, you have few other choices for ISP.

 

The main issue I have is that I simply don’t trust Comcast to have any concern for their customers’ interests. If they want to do this and customers don't want it or are negatively impacted, I frankly don’t expect Comcast to care one bit. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (2)

Why not buy your own router instead of using Comcast's? I don't believe they can do that if you buy your own router. I bought one years ago and I'm glad I did.

 

Amazon has a big selection of wireless routers, so you should be able to find one that will meet your needs. I'd dump Comcast's router in a heartbeat if I was still using one.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
The team at Mitro Labs, the developer of a password manager, is joining Twitter, and its software is being released under a free and open source license, Mitro said Thursday.
Some of those seeking to scrub their histories from the Web under Europe's "right to be forgotten" rule are being economical with the truth when making their requests, Google said Thursday.
A U.S. district court judge has ruled against Microsoft in the company's effort to oppose a U.S. government search warrant for emails stored in Ireland.
Hewlett-Packard has changed its direction on OpenVMS, giving the operating system -- and users -- something of a reprieve.
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission failed to adequately consider the consumer benefits of easy in-app purchases in its recent complaints accusing Apple and Amazon.com of allowing children to buy digital products without parental permission, according to some critics of the agency.
The impending arrival of 25G will help drive the Layer 2-3 Ethernet switch market to approach $25 billion in 2018, according to Dell'Oro Group.
Google is looking to make your work day a bit more social and is taking its Google Hangouts into the business arena.
The number of government requests worldwide seeking Twitter users' data, or the removal of content, increased during the first half of 2014.
Despite greater security awareness, most C-suite executives continue to undervalue CISOs, survey shows.
Here's a look at 5 products that manage video in the enterprise.
randomness