How to stop Comcast from turning my wireless router into a public WiFi hotspot?

jackson

Apparently Comcast has decided to piggyback public hotspots onto their customers’ private wireless routers. I have no desire for my router to become a zombie hotspot. Frankly, I feel like they should pay me for the privilege just like they extorted from Netflix if they want to use my house and equipment for their own purposes. Plus, won’t sharing my bandwidth come at a cost to my own upload and download speeds?

Topic: Networking
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (3)

Why not buy your own router instead of using Comcast's? I don't believe they can do that if you buy your own router. I bought one years ago and I'm glad I did.

 

Amazon has a big selection of wireless routers, so you should be able to find one that will meet your needs. I'd dump Comcast's router in a heartbeat if I was still using one.

MrsMith
Vote Up (3)

You can opt out, but while I understand your reaction, in some ways I don’t think there is too much to be upset about here. What I don’t like is Comcast charging customers for the hardware (and charging them dearly), then using the customer’s hardware for their own purposes. That’s more of a philosophical problem that a functional one though. One legitimate area of concern is that this is going to cause signal clutter, especially in areas of high density housing. This could cause performance degradation. There are only so many wireless channels, and these are going to be overlapping in urban environments and apartments, especially since in many Comcast markets, you have few other choices for ISP.

 

The main issue I have is that I simply don’t trust Comcast to have any concern for their customers’ interests. If they want to do this and customers don't want it or are negatively impacted, I frankly don’t expect Comcast to care one bit. 

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Mobile gaming giant DeNA is hoping a streaming platform that serves up plenty of female idol singers beloved by "otaku," or obsessive geeks, can be a hit with users outside Japan.
Apple outlined its new privacy policy and set up a site to explain what information it collects from users and how it handles it, as the company enters new areas like health tracking and mobile payments that have potential privacy implications.
With new funding, the Israeli company opens U.S. offices.
With its purchase of Metacloud, if customers want an OpenStack private cloud, Cisco's got a nice hardware and software combination to sell.
A bug in Apple's HealthKit -- a back-end feature in iOS 8 -- is delaying the launch of outside developers' fitness and health apps, the company said Wednesday.
In a move that could prove unpopular with IT administrators, Google has granted rights to end users of its Apps workplace email and collaboration suite to install third-party software from the company's Google Apps Marketplace.
AT&T says enterprises are about to reap the benefits of the software-defined transformation of its network with faster service setup through an online portal.
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should abandon its efforts to pass net neutrality rules because new regulations would hurt investment and the deployment of broadband, a parade of Republican senators and advocates said Wednesday.
Privately held Metacloud provides OpenStack-as-a-service for global enterprises.
If you get stuck in traffic a lot, your next car may be able to talk to other vehicles and help keep you off jammed roads.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+