Printed files disappearing, reappearing in queue later, with wrong date

Tim Park

We have had a couple machines on our network printing to a network computer.  Lately, we have had a problem with files disappearing in the queue and not printing, getting stuck behind phantom previously-attempted documents that suddenly appear in the queue, or partially printing with no error message on either end.  And they are all showing up in the queue with the date 4:00 pm 12/31/1969

Someone told me to change the internet time server, I tried that and it seemed to work, but briefly.  I have turned off internet time synch, still no difference.  Any ideas?  We are on a mix of XP and Windows 7 machines, and all are running up to date Norton Internet Security. 

Topic: Networking
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Have you tried deleting all of your spooled files? I’m not sure it will resolve the issue, but it’s easy to try so it might be worth a try. Here is a step-by-step from Microsoft Answers:

 

 

“a)   Click on Windows Vista/Windows 7 Start orb and type Command in start menu search field.

 

b)   From the list select and right-click Command Prompt and select Run as administrator. (This will give you an elevated command prompt).

 

c)    Type “net stop spooler”  into command prompt window without the quotes and then press Enter.

You should get a confirmation that the print spooler is stopping.

 

d)   Then type “del %systemroot%\System32\spool\prtiners\* /Q” without the quotes then press Enter.

 

e)   Then type “net start spooler”  without the quotes and then press Enter.

 

f)    Type exit and press Enter to exit the elevated command window”

http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-hardware/prin....

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