Is it time to retire the mouse?

jlister

The iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch are very popular touch-screen interfaces. Microsoft hasn't had much success with Windows Phone 7 but made a major investment deal with Nokia in an attempt to popularize it and its successor, Windows Phone 8. Related to this, Microsoft is adding touch elements to Windows 8 and Apple added code to Lion to help people using touch-screens and trackpads. Are you ready to give up your mouse? Is touch that important? Have you ever used a touchpad, trackball, or other kind of alternative input besides a keyboard and mouse?

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becker
Vote Up (28)

I have kids at home. Sure they can play with my iPad, if they wash their hands first, but I can't see sticky, dirty fingers as being the best instrument for navigating a computer. A mouse is a hundred times more precise, which is important for graphics, games, even word processing. There is no way I'm ready to give up my mouse. I even use a mouse when I'm on a laptop.

jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

I haven't used a mouse in many years, because of carpal tunnel. I hate them. I use a Microsoft Trackball and it works great for me. I don't know why people bother with mice, they have to be one of the most uncomfortable ways to interface with a computer.

I hope they go away forever, I won't miss them. Now I just wish Microsoft would resume making their trackball. They stopped a while back so I had to run around and buy a few extras to keep on hand in case mine failed.

Agili Ron
Vote Up (18)

Hello Friends,

I used a 1.1 for several months and it was my perfect mouse except for the fact that it would skip on quick swipes, eventually I ended up with a Zowie EC2 Evo and its been smooth sailing since. It fits perfectly in my hand when I palm it and I haven't used anything else that comes as close to the 1.1 as the EC2.
I also have a Zowie AM and I feel that it's a bit too small for a palm grip, it feels too cramped and I had to resort to a claw grip to use it. Another mouse that I've seen former 1.1 users gloat about is the Sensei, I almost got one over the EC2 but as of now I don't have any experience with it so I can't say if it's like a 1.1 or not. The Savu looks like it might also fit the bill, I personally would have given it more consideration if it had come out sooner in the US.
The G400, DA, and Spawn are nothing like the 1.1 and I own the former two and I've used them extensively. The G400 and the DA will work very well with a palm grip but they share none of the characteristics of the 1.1, and then you have the Spawn which is very small and suited towards a claw grip.

Thanks and Regards,
Agili Ron

agiliron.com

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