What are the biggest differences between Linux and Windows?

JOiseau

What things will a lifelong Windows user need to adjust to when switching to Linux? Are any of them deal-breakers?

Tags: linux, os, windows
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7 total
geraldo
Vote Up (28)

There are quite some differences. Linux is Open Source while Windows is Microsoft only. Open Source means that thousands of programmers from all over the world contribute to a platform. Maybe it are even hundreds of thousands. This creates a strong advantage. 

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jimlynch
Vote Up (25)

Are you a gamer? If so then Linux might be disappointing, it doesn't have the selection of games that Windows has. However, if you're not then that won't be an issue.

I think perhaps the biggest challenge is to find a desktop distribution that you will enjoy using. I recommend checking out Linux Mint. It's quite easy to install and use, and it offers a certain level of elegance lacking in some other distributions.

See this review:

Linux Mint Cinnamon 14
http://desktoplinuxreviews.com/2012/12/19/linux-mint-cinnamon-14/

You can also check out this one, which uses a slightly different desktop:

Linux Mint 14 MATE
http://desktoplinuxreviews.com/2013/01/02/linux-mint-14-mate/

ehtan
Vote Up (24)

I think one of the biggest things is the completely different file structure architecture. Unlike Windows, there is only one file tree, and everything is mounted to that tree - different drives, directories, everything.  It's a change,and may take some readjustment, but it really doesn't make things difficult, just different.

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (24)

Whether there are any deal-breakers probably is subjective, but for the easily frustrated among us, Linux initially may be challenging (mostly because it's just different). But everything I've read indicates that if you persevere with Linux, you'll be quite happy with it.

 

Here are some insights from a blog called TechSource:

 

"Yeah, there’s no Photoshop, no iTunes, no high-end games and no AutoCAD. Many users often don’t want to switch to Linux due to the lack of apps they mostly depend on. However, the problem is not something that cannot be solved, or at least circumvented. New users can try out Wine, a free software that lets you run Windows-based applications natively on Linux. Most applications like Adobe Photoshop, MS Office, and even World of Warcraft run perfectly on Wine as if they’re running on Windows."

 

 

spookiewon
Vote Up (23)

If you choose a user friendly distro like Ubuntu, probably there are none. I've met Windows users who didn't even know my Ubuntu laptop wasn't running Windows when borrowing it. Go for it!

 

You MIGHT need to get used to not worrying about malware, but I think you'll adjust.

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