Are Kobo tablets any good?

blackdog

I’d never heard of Kobo tablets until recently. Does anybody have any experience with them? Are they a “top tier” product (like Samsung or ASUS) or some cheap-o Chinese knock off best suited for use as a dry erase pad?

Tags: kobo, tablets
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jimlynch
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CNet has an article that will give you a good overview:

New Kobo Arc tablets run the gamut from high-end to extremely low
http://reviews.cnet.com/tablets/kobo-arc-10-hd/4505-3126_7-35826962.html

You can search on specific models to find reviews that will give you a better idea of the pluses and minuses of Kobo tablets.

dthomas
Vote Up (11)

I don’t know if I would quite call them top tier, but Kobo tablets are decent. They have a fairly broad range, so you can get an e-reader or up to a tablet that has hardware specs close to that of a Nexus 10. The price of Kobo tablets isn’t that low, around $400 for the Arc 10” for example, so I wouldn’t really think of it as a budget tablet. You might be able to save 10-20% off the cost of a comparable Samsung or Asus tablet with a Kobo, but unlike many of the cheap no-brand Chinese tablets, the Kobo will most likely function reliably even if the build quality isn't quite up to the best maunfacturers' standards.

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