How can I display video from a Galaxy S3 on an HDTV?

rousseau

Unlike some other devices, the S3 doesn't come with a microHDMI, there is only a USB port. I have everything on my phone - Netflix, Youtube, Break, etc. - and as much as I like Samsung's display, I enjoy my HDTV more. Is there a way to connect the phone to a HDTV to watch movies/videos/whatnot?

Answer this Question

Answers

3 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (18)

See this page for info about an HDTV adapter:

http://www.samsung.com/hk_en/consumer/mobile/mobile-phones/accessories/E...

"Features: Conversion MHL -> HDMI

Spec: Supports HD signal up to 1080p

Interface:

Input: Micro USB (11pin)

Output: HDMI A

Power: Micro USB (5pin)

Color: Black

Demension: 67(W) x 142(H) x 18(D)mm

Compatible: GALAXY S III, GALAXY S III LTE"

wstark
Vote Up (17)

If you already have an HDMI cable, you can get an after-market adapter for about $10. I only looked on amazon, there may even be cheaper options out there somewhere. I'm surprised that Samsung didn't add an HDMI port on th S4, it seems to me there is an obvious demand for it at this point.

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (15)

You can buy an adapter to connect your Samsung Galaxy S3 to your HDTV, but they cost $40.

 

BTW, it appears the Galaxy S4 also lacks an HDMI port.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Last week we heard that Amazon would be announcing a phone with a 3D interface. This week we learn that you'll control it by tilting it. And that's weird.
Mobile users of Google's search and YouTube service will soon see more targeted ads that take them straight to the installation pages for advertisers' mobile apps.
U.S. iPhone and iPad sales skewed more toward devices with less storage space in the March quarter compared to the final three-month period of 2013.
Net income is up, yet the company says it needs to raise subscription fees.
Many Americans think the next 50 years will bring custom-ordered, made-to-order organ generation, teleportation and robots that care for the elderly and sick. But not everyone's so hopeful.
Just when you thought it was safe to turn on the ol' Apple TV, three new channels have made their debut on the company's set-top box, bringing the total number of services to roughly six quadrillion. Give or take.
The Apple TV is like that old friend from college--pretty cool, but always crashing in your living room. Its inconsistent stability, frustratingly anemic content offering, and lack of rich input methods have kept it from becoming what Apple enthusiasts long swore it would be: the iPhone of TV set-top boxes. Though its interface and hardware continue to evolve, the little black box faces real competition from faster-moving players that are offering more, like the Roku 3 and the new Fire TV from Amazon.
In today's accessible technology roundup: Google wants to embed cameras in contact lenses, Apple gets a patent for a new GUI for touch devices to improve accessibility and a hacker develops a virtual cane for the blind
Also Spiderman may be avoiding the Xbox One, and Playstation Now is coming to Bravia TVs
Five music labels have filed a lawsuit against streaming music service Pandora Music, saying the company is violating state law by refusing to pay labels and artists for its use of recordings made before 1972.

White Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness