What is the practical usefulness of flexible displays?

dthomas

LG has announced a flexible display in a press release. I think that’s cool in a “well, that’s neat” sort of way, but what are practical uses of a flexible display. Books have remained flat for centuries, and even scrolls are generally unrolled and laid flat when someone reads them (and the LG displays are more “bendy” than paperlike, you won’t be able to roll them up). In large formats like home theater, a curved screen doesn’t seem to offer any significant practical advantages. So what is the point? What advantages are there to a flexible display that would make it worth a premium price?

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jimlynch
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Flexible Displays - What are they and How do they work?
http://samsunggeeks.com/2012/12/03/flexible-displays-what-are-they-and-h...

"Over the past year or so there has been a lot of excitement about the release of flexible displays. The mass production of flexible screens is greatly anticipated, in part because of their purported indestructible qualities - but mostly because they guarantee, bona fide, that we are living in the future we imagined as children. In this article, we take a look at flexible screens and displays and give an overview of how they work."

Christopher Nerney
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It's a good question. This article quotes a Samsung executive who says flexible form factors "will really begin to change how people interact with their devices, opening up new lifestyle possibilities ... [and] allow our partners to create a whole new ecosystem of devices." But there are no specific examples offered in the article, other than a prototype phone with a screen that extends to the sides of the device, allowing users to read messages. I expect there will be some cool uses for flexible screens not far down the road. 

AppDevGuy
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Like a reed in the wind (or a hero in a kung fu movie) perhaps it can bend, and not break. This could be very nice on devices that tend to get dropped occasionally...such as the ones I own. Other than that, perhaps it could be useful in wearable devices such as smart watches. With a lot of smart people thinking about ways to utilize the technology, I’m sure some interesting uses will soon be explored.

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