What’s the best way to resell used video games?

Number6

I have a ton of games that I never have a chance to play any more. It’s the blessing and the curse of having multiple game consoles, I guess. I thought about trading them in on some new stuff at Gamestop, but they offer so little that I would rather let them sit on my shelf and gather dust than essentially give them away. I’m curious what other gamers have found to be the best way to sell their old titles. I have multiple vices that include being greedy and lazy, so I really like to sell them for the most money with the least effort. I’m sure I can’t be the only one.

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jimlynch
Vote Up (13)

I'd try eBay or a yard sale. A yard sale doesn't require shipping and that sort of thing, so perhaps that's the best way to go initially. If you don't sell them then try eBay.

cuetip
Vote Up (11)

Ebay is easy if you have an existing account, and even if you have to set up an account, it doesn’t require much effort. If you don’t have a history of positive feedback, you might get a little less for your stuff because people won't feel as secure about your items/descriptions. Trade in is the easiest, but you get a lot less in return. If you have rare titles that are in demand, Amazon is another option. They also do the trade in, and make it even easier than game stores - just pop it in the mail and get an Amazon credit once it has been received and verified to be in good condition. You can also list items for sale on Amazon but I personally use ebay most of the time.

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