Which is better for reading books, an e-ink eReader or tablet?

jhotz

I’ve stuck with reading books the old fashioned way, paper pages and no batteries. But I’m thinking about going all 2010 and trying e-books. I have a decent android phone, but it’s just no fun reading on a 4.5” screen, so that leaves dedicated e-readers and tablets. I guess the main thing I’m wondering is whether there is a significant advantage to e-ink vs. a typical LCD tablet display from the readers standpoint. Has anyone tried both, and if so, which do you prefer and why?

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TheCount
Vote Up (18)

Well, an e-ink tablet uses very little power, so you don’t have to worry about charging it every night. It will also look much more similar to a traditional printed-on-paper page. Another advantage is that you can get a decent one for very little money. On the other hand, tablet displays have gotten really good over the past year or so, and text looks much better than it used to. Also, most eReaders are not backlit, so make sure to either find one that is, add a light, or be prepared to leave the lights on.  

 

Perhaps if I was only going to use the device for reading, I would go e-ink reader, but personally I would rather not limit myself. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (17)

I have an iPad, an iPhone and a Kindle Paperwhite. I have used my iOS devices to read, and still do at times, but I use the Kindle PaperWhite the most.

 

Why?

 

1. The eink screen is more comfortable on my eyes. After starting at a backlit computer screen, the front lit eink screen is easier on my eyeballs.

 

2. The Kindle Paperwhite has a quiet interface. It is in black and white. There are no videos, apps, and other distracting things in the interface. It is designed solely to read books.

 

3. The Kindle Paperwhite is very light and easy to hold with one hand, unlike my iPad. And the screen is larger than my iPhone's screen.

 

4. Amazon has tons of books available in the Kindle store.

 

You can get more info here: 

 

Kindle Paperwhite, 6" High Resolution Display with Built-in Light, Wi-Fi - Includes Special Offers

Kindle eBooks

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (15)

A site called Ebook Friendly suggests that instead of trying to figure out which device is better for reading ebooks, it's best to first determine your reading preferences. The site offers a 12-question assessment that will help you decide. 

 

Among the questions are whether reading in color is important to you, whether you want to read enhanced books, and whether you want constant access to the web. Based on my answers, Ebook Friendly suggested I would prefer an e-reader, but it was only a slight preference.

 

Along with the questions is a lot of information about what e-readers and tablets can and can't do.

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