Why are iPhone users in China being shocked?

bralphye

I heard about someone being shocked by an iPhone in China for the second time this week. And no, I do not mean that they were pleasantly surprised by some rad feature on the device, I mean “ZAP!” electric shock. What could be causing it to happen? There are millions upon millions of iPhones in consumer hands, so the odds are probably higher that one would get struck by lightning, but still. Is it anything to be concerned about?

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Number6
Vote Up (12)

I read about the two incidents you are probably referring to. In both cases, it seems that counterfeit or aftermarket chargers were being used. Now, keep in mind, this is China, where mothers are afraid to use domestically produced baby formula because it has been dangerously adulterated so many times in the past, and has actually killed babies. It’s not really all that surprising that there would also be unsafe electrical components there. Use an OEM or reputable charger and don’t sweat it. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (9)

Seems like they were using non-apple chargers, etc. This is a good argument for buying the official product. When you buy a clone, who knows how well it was made? And if it adhered to proper standards.

It's safer to spend a few bucks more and buy the official Apple version.

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