Anyone else worried about the Duqu worm?

rcook12

I’ve seen tons of articles pop up in my news feeds today about the Duqu worm, and the latest news tells me that there is still no patch to close the vulnerability in Window.  My level of concern is growing. How much risk is there that this worm will cause widespread harm? Are businesses here in the U.S. of A. at risk?

Topic: Security
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jdixon
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From what I have read from Forbes, it seems that the Duqu worm is possibly the result of some government's intelligence agency at work, and seems to be used in targeted attacks.  Now that it is out there, who knows how far it will spread.    It seems that it uses a .doc file to install itself on your hard drive, so I certainly won't be opening any Word files that appear unexpectedly in my inbox.  Hopefully the patch that Microsoft is working on will be released shortly.  

 

Symantec published a white paper on Duqu that you might find interesting:  http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/media/security_response/whitepapers/w32_duqu_the_precursor_to_the_next_stuxnet.pdf 

 

jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

No, not at all for my personal computing. I run Linux and Mac OS X. As far as I know neither of them is vulnerable to the Duqu worm at this point. It seems to be a Windows only virus.

That said, it certainly has the potential to cause significant problems so I hope the authorities can get a handle on it fast.

For those who aren't familiar with it, here's some background information:

http://www.dailytech.com/Nasty+Duqu+Worm+Exploits+Same+Microsoft+Office+...

"The "Duqu" worm is currently sweeping corporate networks worldwide, seeking to infect as many machines as possible in what appears to be an effort to target power plants, oil refineries and pipelines.

Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) revealed this week that Duqu uses similar code to the Stuxnet worm, which crippled Iranian nuclear power computer systems in 2010. Many have voiced suspicions that U.S. defense or intelligence agencies were behind Stuxnet, but it appears extreme unlikely that the U.S. government had anything to do with Duqu. In fact, Duqu appears to be targeting U.S. allies."

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