Fake article posted on Facebook - Can it cause a virus?

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I clicked on a supposed article my friend posted on Facebook via my IPhone 4s, and realized that it was not legit. I have then received failure Demon notifications in my yahoo mail account. I'm guessing it's a virus?? How do I remove this? I only ever access my email through my iPhone. I'm a bit worried that security gas been compromised.
Thanks in advance!

Topic: Security
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jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

If you used an iPhone, I doubt you got any kind of virus that would harm it. However, if you use Windows then you should have a malware and antivirus program installed. The iPhone, as far as I know, does not have any viruses.

jhotz
Vote Up (6)

Hmmm, you certainly could install malware through Facebook, although as far as I know that isn't possible with the iPhone without actually choosing to install an application (or at least it isn't likely).  Since the problem seems related to your Yahoo mail, my first though is that your Yahoo account has been compromised. I have a couple of acquaintances who have experienced that problem, which has been somewhat common in the past month or two. 

http://thenextweb.com/insider/2013/01/31/yahoo-mail-users-still-seeing-a...

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