Have you had problems with the Flashback trojan on Macs?

SilverHawk

We only have a few people that bring their own Macs to my office, and as far as I know, it hasn't been a problem for any of them. Then again, they are all pretty much convinced that "Macs don't get viruses."  I'm not a Mac user personally, and we don't really support their use, but employees can use their personal Macs to access our WiFi. What are the risks posed by the Flashback trojan, and what are you doing to make sure that your network is safe?

Topic: Security
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jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

I haven't had any problems with it. I installed Apple's Java update, but I also disabled Java in Safari.

Here's how you can do it too:

http://www.itworld.com/security/266254/turn-java-safari

Here's some background on how you can diagnose and remove the trojan:

http://www.geek.com/articles/apple/check-if-your-mac-has-the-flashback-t...

dthomas
Vote Up (13)

 

I would certainly install the latest Java update immediately, if you haven't already.  It's easy to get complacent.  This must be excruciating for my, "Macs don't get viruses!" buddy.  They only make up something like 10-15% of the market, so it stands to reason that they would be less likely to be targeted by malware.  But "less likely" doesn't equal never.

 

Here is an article about checking to see if a Mac is infected.  There are a couple of links to free checkers if you need it.  http://9to5mac.com/2012/04/10/free-app-checks-for-the-flashback-trojan-infecting-600000-macs/#/vanilla/discussion/embed     

 

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