How to avoid malware on Android devices?

ernard

Like any other operating system that becomes popular, Android is a target of individuals that want to install malware on devices. Earlier this week, Google removed thousands of apps from Google Play, although many of them were junk apps, and not specifically malware. You always hear about being careful to avoid installing malware, but exactly what do you do to exercise that level of care? Let's face it, not every developer is EA or Google, most of them are unknown developers that are (hopefully) honest, but how can I tell which ones aren't and which apps are malware?

Topic: Security
Answer this Question

Answers

4 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (15)

Here are some tips to avoid malware on your Android device:

1. Always have a good anti-malware, anti-virus app installed.

2. Don't side-load apps from untrusted sources.

3. Stick to well known and trusted developers in the Google Play store.

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (15)

You have to exercise some due diligence. That means first making sure you're downloading an app from the developer or Google Play, and not from a third-party source. Second, read the reviews of the app wherever you can find them. If the app is malware, someone will be talking about it online.

It's also wise to install anti-malware software specifically for Android. Again, check reviews.

Finally, just do a search on the name of the app along with the word "malware" to see what turns up.

owen
Vote Up (12)

The two main things are to only install mature applications that have a track record of significant installs  and lots of reviews, and check out the developer to see what else they have done and whether there are complaints about their other apps. This is far from perfect, but it can help avoid a lot of problems.

The anti-virus programs on Android phones are mostly a waste of time, but some of them can alert you to apps that are hiding malware. Sometimes anyway. They can also give you false positives.
 
One piece of advice that I've always found useless is to review the apps permissions. Well, good luck getting many apps that actually respect your privacy. Plus, just to function many apps need permissions for access to things that aren't apparent at first glance. Yeah, in an ideal world I would only install apps that didn't request any permissions, but until we pay for every app and don't expect developers to make us stuff for free, there is going to be a trade off.

Techvedic
Vote Up (2)

Hi,

You can prevent malware following these steps:-

1. Install a trusted antivirus for android device.

2. If you are using internet don't click untrusted link.

3. try to avoid open adult sites.

4. use wisely bluetooth system.

 

Thanks

Techvedic

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
A vulnerability in a web-based graphics system led to a breach of The Wall Street Journal's network by a hacker, the newspaper acknowledged late Tuesday.
A company that specializes in selling information on software vulnerabilities has reignited a debate over the handling of such information, especially when it pertains to privacy-focused tools.
Developers of Tor software believe they've identified a weakness that was scheduled to be revealed at the Black Hat security conference next month that could be used to de-anonymize Tor users.
Email encryption startup Virtru has launched a version of its service for businesses using Google Apps, a market segment that the company thinks is showing increased interest in secure communications.
Researchers have concluded that those billions of connected devices could help save lives in the event of disaster, even one that knocks out the Internet
Goodwill Industries International said Monday federal authorities are investigating a possible payment card breach at its U.S.-based retail outlets.
A presentation on a low-budget method to unmask users of a popular online privacy tool, TOR, will no longer go ahead at the Black Hat security conference early next month.
Three stealthy tracking mechanisms designed to avoid weaknesses in browser cookies pose potential privacy risks to Internet users, a new research paper has concluded.
It's not just dissidents looking for anonymous email, but everyday people who'd rather not reveal their true identity.
In its quest to help enterprises seek out and neutralize all threats to their Wi-Fi networks, AirMagnet is now looking to the skies.

White Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+