How to avoid questionable Android apps?

blackdog

What are some good practices to avoid installing Android apps that aren’t malware, but play fast and loose with your privacy and information?

Topic: Security
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owen
Vote Up (8)

In addition to Christopher’s suggestions, I would add a couple of things:

1. Only install apps from Google Play or Amazon’s Store. A significant source of problem apps comes from people installing pirated apps to avoid ads. Either put up with the ads or pay for the version without them. Plus, developers need to make a living.  

2. Restrict downloads from unknown sources. This will help prevent drive-by downloads.

3. No pron apps! I’m not being a prude, these types of apps are more likely to abuse your permissions and do things to cost you money.

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (7)

All apps will inform you of the permissions you need to accept in order to download the app. If some of them seem unreasonable to you, I just wouldn't download it.

 

If you really want an app, however, you can use a tool such as SnoopWall that allows you to control which permissions to allow for the app after you download it. This article explains how SnoopWall works.

jimlynch
Vote Up (6)

I agree with Owen, only install apps from trusted sources. If you do otherwise you run a real risk of having problems. The Google Play store is certainly at the top of the list, but if you own an Amazon tablet then you should use the Amazon Appstore for Android.

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