How did Microsoft cause millions of No-IP.com domains to go down?

LolaBelle

I know that Microsoft is a big company with lots of capabilities, but how did they take down all of No-IP.com’s domains? From what I’ve read, that wasn’t Microsoft’s intention, and they were trying to combat Windows targeting malware, which is an admirable goal. I wasn’t directly impacted by this, but a vendor I deal with almost daily was, so it still had an effect. How is it even possible for Microsoft to take down all of those domains?

Topic: Security
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jimlynch
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No-IP had a statement about this that you might find interesting:

No-IP’s Formal Statement on Microsoft Takedown
http://www.noip.com/blog/2014/06/30/ips-formal-statement-microsoft-taked...

rousseau
Vote Up (2)

They were actually acting pursuant to a federal court order which gave them full DNS authority over no-IP domains. Microsoft then seized 22 of no-IP’s domains in order to take down malware creators. Unfortunately, the net cast was too wide and it ended up taking down a lot of servers used by innocent people/companies. Malware disruption is a laudable goal, and while Microsoft was apparently acting with good intentions it would certainly seem that they were overly aggressive when it came to no-IP.

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