How do I protect my privacy on Google+?

rhager
Tags: privacy
Topic: Security
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2 total
ablake
Vote Up (20)

If you want to be private, you shouldn't post your information on a social networking site. Sure, Google+ is better than Facebook, but you're still putting yourself in a position where anyone who hacks/guesses your password can then get access to all your profile information - which could include your Gmail account and thus your Google Calendar and Google Contacts.

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

You could do what I ended up doing, delete your Google+ account and don't look back.

You'll find instructions in this article:

Delete your Google+ account
http://www.itworld.com/software/238217/delete-your-google-account

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