How does one hack a system to steal information?

delia25

Let me state first: I’m not looking for a how-to guide to become a cybercriminal. I simply have garnered some concerns because of recent stories that surfaced in the media. One concern comes from the recent ‘whistleblowing’ action by Edward Snowden who blew the cover off the NSA operation.

So how is the government hacking into people’s private information with the PRISM system?

Tags: hacking, NSA, PRISM
Topic: Security
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2 total
wstark
Vote Up (9)

It’s not exactly a case of hacking with the PRISM system. It is an “authorized” form of information retention that has been “legally” in effect for certain systems since Bill Clinton passed the CALEA Act in the 1990s.

 

 

Today, telecom providers that offer both traditional voice services and IP telephony as well as ISPs, have backdoors open in their system that allow government intelligence networks like PRISM and the FBI’s DCSnet to monitor certain communications. Originally, CALEA did not include clauses to monitor internet communications but that started to change with introduction of the Patriot Act. This is called lawful (or legal) intercept, which is often abbreviated LI. Both Microsoft and a company called Voip-Pal.com have their hands in this technology, which you can learn about by following the links.

jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

I do not know exactly what the government is doing, that's a tough question to answer. However, if you are looking to opt out of Prism, then this page might be helpful:

http://prism-break.org

"Opt out of PRISM, the NSA’s global data surveillance program. Stop reporting your online activities to the American government with these free alternatives to proprietary software."

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