How reliable is VeriFace facial recognition software?

aiden

I use VeriFace to log onto my Lenovo laptop by default. It is quick and logs me in easily, but I have to wonder how secure it really is. Would some other brown haired, blue-eyed guy in his 30s fool the software on my laptop, for example? I'm a big fan of making things easier for myself, but I do need a modicum of security too.

Topic: Security
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blackdog
Vote Up (22)

So-So. I've used VeriFace before, which I think may only be on Lenovo machines, and it logged me on quickly and easily. It's good enough for casual security, if that term has any meaning. It would probably be sufficient to deny access to the guy in your office who likes to play tricks on you. I haven't check this myself, but I have seen tests of some facial recognition software that is easily fooled by a photograph. Considering the ubiquitous presence of mobile devices with good cameras, it wouldn't be all that difficult for someone to take a snapshot of you and potentially defeat the software. Perhaps the software has improved since those tests, but I'm not sure. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

Here's an interesting background article on this.

Facial recognition system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facial_recognition_system

"A facial recognition system is a computer application for automatically identifying or verifying a person from a digital image or a video frame from a video source. One of the ways to do this is by comparing selected facial features from the image and a facial database.
It is typically used in security systems and can be compared to other biometrics such as fingerprint or eye iris recognition systems.[1]"

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