How secure is NFC?

hughye

I have NFC capabilities in my phone, but I’ve never had a use for it so it’s always turned off. However, there are some efforts to use NFC in smartphone for payments, and it’s rumoured that mobile payments may be a big feature in iPhone 6. Having my phone make payments just by being near something makes me a little nervous. How secure is NFC? Couldn’t someone else in a checkout line have a device that could potentially steal my information?

Topic: Security
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ehtan
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By virtue of how close someone would need to be to use NFC, it is pretty secure. The range is no more than an inch or two, so someone would have to pretty much be in physical contact with you. Also, if you don’t keep it turned on when you are not using it, that would negate any concern I can think of. Still, I guess if is is on, there is some small chance of being compromised. Also, aside from NFC specific issues, there would be the same concern as using QR code, in that you could be directed to a malicious website. 

 

Here is an article that goes further into detail about NFC and related security concerns, as well as some ways to mitigate risks. http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/how-secure-is-nfc-tech.htm 

jimlynch
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How secure is NFC tech?
http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/how-secure-is-nfc-tech.htm

"Many experts say NFC really is fundamentally secure by virtue of its extremely short range. In order to snag your NFC signal, a hacker would need to be very close to you. Uncomfortably close. In other words, you'd know they were there. And unless it was a very intimate friend of yours, you'd likely not be happy about it.

There's more to the physical aspects of NFC that make it troublesome for even determined hackers."

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