Should Android users worry about Java?

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The US Government's security warning about Java on computers has been widely reported at this point, but I can seem to find what that means for Android users. After all, doesn't Android inherently use Java? Does the security vulnerability warned about apply to Android devices, and if so, what do you do about it?

Topic: Security
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jimlynch
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Here's an article that covers the Java security threat:

Java security threat explained
http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/13792549-java-security-threat-...

"The US Department of Homeland Security has advised people to temporarily disable the Java software on their personal computers and laptops, so they can avoid being exploited by hackers. The warning came in an advisory issued late Thursday evening.

Computer security experts believe that hackers have found a flaw in Java's coding. Apparently, the flaw creates a gateway for cybercrimes and thefts of various natures.
According to an expert, the malware inside Java has targeted Windows, Linux and UNIX systems. The OS X operating system (Apple) is currently safe, but can come under threat because it is largely similar to UNIX. Java is cross-platform software, used by all operating systems to some extent."

aiden
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It's not a problem. Jerry Hildenbrand addressed this concern on Adroidcentral a couple days ago. Essentially, Android doesn't use Java in the browser, which is where the Java vulnerability was before the latest patch from Oracle.

http://www.androidcentral.com/mail-bag-android-affected-java-security-is...

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