What additional steps are you taking to prevent the rush of malware/rougue apps targeting your android smartphones?

bcastle

The good old days when there wasn't much focus on smartphones by "bad guys" are over. I've just read a study by Juniper Networks that indicates Android malware has increased by 472% over the past three months. 472%!?!   I had to read that number twice. This shows just how quickly malicious individuals have responded to the rapidly rising popularity of smartphones, especially Android models. So are you taking any new steps to address this increased level of risk, or just sticking with what you have been doing?

Topic: Security
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jimlynch
Vote Up (20)

Hi bcastle,

I actually own an iPhone so Android malware hasn't been a problem. ;)

But here's an app for Android that might help you protect your phone.

Lookout Mobile Security: Protect Android From Malware
http://www.makeuseof.com/dir/lookout-mobile-security-protect-phone-malwa...

"Lookout Mobile Security comes as a free, trial, and paid version. Using this app you can search for malware on your Android smartphone and block it. Not only does it detect the presence of malware but it also prevents the introduction of malware; for instance it blocks malware while data is transferred from your computer to your phone.

Another great feature of the app is to help you remotely locate your phone – something you will find helpful if your phone was stolen. You can even remotely sound a loud alarm on your phone even if it is on Silent."

delia25
Vote Up (14)

 

A big part of it is that because there is no initial application review process, it is easy for someone with ill intentions to pay $25 and post malware applications in the Android marketplace.  Honestly, I think the best security practice for an Android phone is to be very selective about what applications you download.  Correction - very, very, very selective. 

 

Beyond a deep seated presumption that any application is potential malware,  I run AVG Antivirus and make certain that it is up to date.  I use AVG on my laptop as well, and it has worked well for me on both platforms.  Plus it has the benefit of being free.  

 

Techvedic
Vote Up (1)

Hi,

 

I will suggest you take backup from your phone and the complete reset it.

 

Thanks

Techvedic

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