What do you do to minimize the security risks created by Java?

RomanZ

In my experience, two of the greatest risks to system security are Flash and Java. Flash has a pretty central place in web design, as those of use who have used iPads, iPhones and Android 2.1 or earlier are well aware. Hopefully the widespread use of Java will fall off now that Adobe has killed support for development of flash for mobile platforms and HTML5 is on the rise. Java, on the other hand, doesn't seem to be going anywhere and remains a popular vehicle for exploits. What do you do at your company to minimize the risks that are created by using Java?

Tags: Flash, HTML5, java
Topic: Security
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (25)

I think it's a good idea to just get rid of both of them if you don't need them. I ranted about flash in a column a while back, and I still think it stinks.

Why Flash Sucks
http://jimlynch.com/en/2010/04/07/why-flash-sucks/

As far as Java goes, good riddance if you can just get rid of it. Neither of these things is really worth bothering with, given the security headaches (among other things).

So if you can remove them from your system(s) then more power to you. You're probably saving yourself a lot of aggravation in the long run.

henyfoxe
Vote Up (25)

 

Java is a big issue, in my opinion.  Browser plug-ins are one of the favorite avenues for cyberattacks, and have been for a long time.  Fortunately, both Chrome and Firefox block out of date plug-ins, which definitely helps matters, at least with those two browsers.  Of all plug-ins, Java is most often used for exploits, in my experience.  Fortunately, there is a good way to minimize the risks of Java: remove Java completely.  There is almost no need for it, and most users will never even miss it.  If you use Chrome, you can use sandboxing to run Java in a secondary browser if you absolutely have to run it.  

 

BTW, apparently we aren't the only ones concerned about the vulnerabilities created by Java.  Mozilla is considering blocking the Java plug-in to help stop SSL attacks.It will be interesting to see if they follow through, and if so, whether there is a reaction from Firefox users.   

 

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
About 2.6 million payment cards at Michaels Stores and another 400,000 at subsidiary Aaron Brothers may have been affected in a card skimming attack that compromised its point-of-sale systems, the retailer said Thursday.
National security may be at stake as private businesses try to manage a growing number of cyberthreats, but IT professionals shouldn't have to bear that burden alone.
Worried about how the Heartbleed vulnerability may affect your personal accounts? A new tool may be of help.
Whether it's the first time you've picked up an iPad or the seventeenth time you've pulled out your iPhone today, there are probably still some iOS 7 features and functionality that you're not familiar with. Don't sweat it: We're here to help. We've collected some of our favorite and most useful tips and compiled them here, just for you.
The Tor Project has flagged 380 Tor relays vulnerable to the critical Heartbleed flaw to be rejected from the Tor anonymity network, reducing the network's entry and exit capacity.
Cybercriminals have started using a sophisticated Android Trojan app designed for e-banking fraud to target Facebook users, possibly in an attempt to bypass the two-factor authentication protection on the social network.
Microsoft may have retired Windows XP, but one of China's leading security vendors is trying to keep the OS threat-free, and rolling out protection software to hundreds of millions of users in the nation.
For almost an entire year, malicious attackers may have been harvesting customer information including credit card data.
During a week in which everyone seemed to be searching for answers amid revelations of the Heartbleed bug, several universities and their partners announced new efforts to explore IT security advances.
The amount of electronic information (e.g., documents, images, emails, videos) organizations produce is staggering. Storing all your digital data in your data center can be expensive. That's why cloud storage -- which often comes at a fraction of the cost of storing the information on-premises -- has become increasingly popular.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+