What is the most secure form of online communication?

cuetip

Emails are considered fair game by law enforcement, and after 6 months the current practice is to read/seize any that are wanted without a warrant. I think this is pretty terrible. Why do I have suddenly no right to privacy when my emails are concerned after 180 days have passed? I don’t buy the argument that if you don’t have anything to hide, you shouldn’t be worried. How can you communicate online in a secure way, without wondering if some guy who hated you back in high school is now a cop reading all of your "private" messages?

Topic: Security
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george70633
Vote Up (19)

The only way of secure online communication is by using the Cackle.it communication platform which will be launched in September 2013 that provides secure, safe, private and confidential voice, chat, email and browsing experience using the most advanced end to end encryption technology where by no one will intercept your comunication until it reaches the intended reciepient.

jimlynch
Vote Up (19)

This page has quite a bit of info on how to opt out of the NSA's Prism spying program, including a list of email encryption programs:

http://prism-break.org

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (19)

I think your question is best answered by the digital security professionals monitoring your online activities and this website. How about it, folks? Any tips for us?

nchristine
Vote Up (18)

You need to have end-to-end encryption on your communications, and no record of the conversation. Oh, and use Tor. Google, Microsoft and Apple all have products that should be fairly secure, such as Skype and Facetime, but nothing is totally secure (see this Slate article), and the headaches of taking many additional steps aren’t likely to appeal to most people. 

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