Can HTML5 replace crusty old vertical market applications?

lbloom

Throughout my career, I’ve run into a number of poorly-programmed applications for vertical markets. Whether it’s supporting medical services or a real estate multiple listing service, most of these programs have a Windows 3 look and feel about them: crappy graphics, slow and buggy performance, and poor to nonexistent technical support from their developers. If HTML5 can make it easier for programmers to write code that works in Windows and on a tablet or phone, it could finally kickstart a new wave of better-written software that isn’t so painful to use. What do you think?

Topic: Software
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mstrauss
Vote Up (33)

More likely, apps that can be sold through new app marketplaces (Apple, Android, Amazon, Microsoft) will be where we find new programs to replace aging vertical market apps. Since programmers respond favorably to the financial incentives, the promise of a much larger user base should appeal to their baser instincts. The biggest downside to HTML5 is that people don’t associate HTML with spending money.

Jeff Sepeta
Vote Up (31)

As Paul Thorott points out in his description of Microsoft Windows Live SkyDrive, rewriting applications to become HTML5-compliant can yield vast performance improvements as well as allow developers to add more modern features.
http://www.winsupersite.com/article/Windows-Phone-7/skydrive-june-2011-update-139530

jimlynch
Vote Up (27)

I think HTML 5 opens the door to new possibilities in ways that weren't available before. I understand your antipathy toward those crappy looking older applications. Ugh.

Hopefully developers will take advantage of it ASAP and start replacing some of the...er...vintage applications that were designed in bygone days.

The sooner HTML 5 applications replace the fossils, the better.

Mahesh Guruswamy
Vote Up (22)

HTML5 is only one part of the equation, namely view. If your mid tier, backends etc are crappy, the end application will still be crappy, even if it looks pretty to the user. If you want to fix a poorly-programmed application (including but not limited to performance issues, scalability issues etc), you need to fix it in all layers, not just the view. So a blanket statement 'If HTML5 can make it easier for programmers to write code that works in Windows and on a tablet or phone ..' is incorrect. The right thing to think about is ...'Will It will help developers write device agnostic views'.

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