Email client to replace Eudora 7.1 for Windows 7

suzy

I am looking for a smart and supported Email client to replace my beloved Eudora 7.1. Speed, fast search across all or selected mailboxes/folders, smart filters, good sorting capability, spell checker, support for multiple accounts, a friendly, clean user interface w. message preview (like Eudora's), option to store mail on my PC, low memory usage and a mailbox format supported by a good migration utility (like Aid4Mail) are important to me. Which client would do the job?

Topic: Software
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owen
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The first option that comes to mind is Mozilla Thunderbird, which should meet your requirements. It’s open source, and it’s also free, so you can try it to see if you like it without spending any money. http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/thunderbird/

suzy

Owen, thanks a lot for your reply. I am aware about Thunderbird. However when I see on their forum tens of messages like the samples below for more than 1 yr w. no fix in sight, then I am not sure that TB is the "right" Email. I'd much rather pay for the Email client than get something for free that deletes my mailboxes... I'd love to find something better, Eudora spoiled me. I never ever had any problems with it. Any other suggestions would be appreciated.   "You really wish to know how I feel about losing about 1,000 emails including important financial reports, as well as contact addresses for all their senders? Thunderbird, you don't have a "face" angry enough to indicate how I feel about it. I wish someone had warned me about T-bird before I signed on. I will do my utmost to warn others to avoid T-bird altogether so as to escape the fate of all troubled and angry posters here. In my opinion, the employees of T-bird are completely irresponsible and incompetent." "I see a lot of solutions, some of them seeming to work in some situations, leaving others still desperate. First and for all, WHY is this problem appearing in the first place? E.g. solution by Andrew cost me 1,5 hours of work and didn't help and left me with a terrible headache. But if it would, should I repeat this burden every time it will happen again? Forgive me but a mail program which lets e-mails disappear just like that, without any solid reason and only to be restored (IF at all) only by solutions, far too technical and elaborate for most computer users, it should be considered as RUBBISH. I'm sorry but no other, proper term is coming to my mind. This is such a fatal problem that it leaves me with only one solution: to abandon TB and trying another mail client. " "I have had this lost emails and entire folders problem at a progressive frequency in recent months. it was so disruptive on linux that i finally gave up on thunderbird. now that i have windows again, i went back to thunderbird a few weeks ago ... but it is happening on windows, too, though less frequently. this has become so aggravating that i am probably going to abandon thunderbird on windows, too, esp.now that i have discovered that this has been a long-standing problem, with ho apparent success at resolution. how can anybody who actually relies on email even consider to use thunderbird? i am majorly disappointed, to say the least!"
jimlynch
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Windows 7 email: 5 best free clients
http://www.techradar.com/us/news/software/applications/windows-7-email-5...

"Microsoft ditched Windows Mail along with several other Vista mistakes, and so if you want an email client then you'll now have to uncover one for yourself.

That doesn't have to be a major problem, though. There are now plenty of free clients around, most with lengthy feature lists and wide support for all the key email standards.

And to give you a head start, we've identified our favourite five email programs for Windows 7 - all you have to do is choose the one that best suits your needs."

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