Have you migrated your Mac to OS X 10.7 Lion? Don't.

jsepeta

I lost nearly 100 files a couple of nights ago on my Mac Book running OS X 10.71 "Lion". The files had been saved to directories created from within Logic 9.15, and completely disappeared from the drive when I looked for them in the Finder. They were nowhere to be found with the Spotlight search function, and since Lion doesn't ship on bootable media (as all its predecssors have, going back to the early 1990's with System 7), there was no way to run Disk Tools on the drive to attempt to fix whatever sectors had been written to. As a result of checking with Apple Support, which had no answers for how to recover my data, I've been forced to rebuild the laptop with OS X 10.68 Snow Leopard.

Researching this problem, I discovered that Apple knows of a bug with the Auto-Save function, which may be related to this data loss issue. However, sources seem to point to that issue only when saving to drives that are not formatted as HFS+ (the native disk format for OS X). That wasn't the case with my data loss, since my drive is only 2 months old and was formatted with HFS+ in July when I purchased it. It is possible that 10.72 will fix my issue, but since Apple has kept a fairly closed-door policy about announcing bugs and security flaws in their OS, I would not expect this to get much press attention.

Apple's move to Lion has received a great deal of attention in the media, and since it will likely be required for people to use their new iCloud service, I'm more than disappointed to be forced back to a previous version that won't be iCloud-compatible. But in over 25 years of Mac use, I have only experienced unrecoverable data loss in a couple of instances, so I thought it best to warn people of the seriousness of this current flaw.

Topic: Software
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cfcardrecovery
Vote Up (25)

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dbrown
Vote Up (25)

 

Since everyone who upgrades to Lion does it as a download from the App Store, there's no DVD media. But could you have made a bootable USB key? 

http://www.redmondpie.com/mac-os-x-lion-usb-thumb-drive-by-apple/

 

jsepeta

I had looked into picking up the USB key from an Apple dealer on Monday but they wanted $80, and I've already paid for $29 of that from the initial Lion download. I don't have any blank USB keys to dedicate to this, but I guess I'll take advantage of the back-to-school sales to pick up a couple of spares. There's no reason that Apple should charge $50 for a 4gb-8gb flash drive, since the going rate is $30 for a 16gb drive.
pcaulfield
Vote Up (22)

Why didn't you back up your data to an external hard drive? Everyone knows you should back up your important work.

jsepeta

I was navigating through the finder to upload the bounce-down MP3's to my band's cloud-based storage site (box.net) - so pretty much the files disappeared while making backups.
OldHippie
Vote Up (22)

Why did you reinstall 10.68? Couldn't you roll back the OS to a previous version?

jsepeta

Nope, Apple doesn't have an uninstaller feature like Windows does for uninstalling Service Packs. The migration from 10.7 to 10.7.1 is one-way. And the migration from 10.6.x to 10.7 is not only one-way, it's more destructive, making a great number of changes and file deletions from the previous version. It's similar to the move from Windows XP to Vista, or from Vista to Windows 7.
mstrauss
Vote Up (20)

Could you have tried to run 3rd party data recovery tools like Data Rescue? http://www.prosofteng.com/products/data_rescue_update.php

jsepeta

That's a great idea! I'll make sure I order the upgrade for my copy of Data Rescue soon. But since we're planning to record again in another couple of days, there's not enough time to dork around with an unstable 10.7.x waiting for updates to arrive. We need to have the assurance that when we nail a recording, the entire directory structure is not going to disappear.

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