How does Microsoft Expression Compare to Adobe Dreamweaver?

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Our company's newest web programmer says he prefers Microsoft Expression, a program I've never heard about before today. The people who we had working on our website before used Dreamweaver. Are the programs that much different, and why should we move all our work to Expression if it worked fine in Dreamweaver?

Topic: Software
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Expression and Dreamweaver are two entirely different environments for coding websites. Dreamweaver is pretty old-school, I guess, because it relies on Adobe Flash for you to develop interactive content. Expression, on the other hand, is fully .Net integrated which means it can use code that developers have built in Visual Studio using C# or other supported languages - not just HTML and CSS like Dreamweaver. Also, Expression can be used for Silverlight development and HTML5, which means Expression is a better platform for 2011. Expression will help you to build future-focused websites, not old-fashioned ones.

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