How good of an office suite is KOffice?

SilverHawk

We are looking to save some money and switch from paying for MS Office to using an open source office suite. I had mostly been thinking of OpenOffice because I have used it a couple times and found it pretty easy to use, but my use was limited to simple tasks. Today someone suggested looking into KOffice, which I've never even heard of before. Is it on the same level as OpenOffice? Would it be adequate for small business use?

Topic: Software
Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
jimlynch
Vote Up (15)

The only way to really know is to download it for yourself and check it out. It's hard to generalize about its suitability since every business has different needs, but it's probably worth checking out.

Here's a good background article about it:

KOffice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KOffice

"KOffice is a free open source office suite which is available for FreeBSD, Linux, OS X, and Windows. It contains a word processor (KWord), a spreadsheet application (KCells), a vector graphics-based drawing tool KOffice Artwork, and a presentation program (KOffice Showcase).

In late 2010 most KOffice developers formed Calligra Suite that now contains a number of features present in KOffice 2.3 but not later versions."

Here's a comparison of KOffice 2 and OpenOffice 3:

http://www.ehow.com/info_12199562_koffice-2-versus-openoffice-3.html

"The ability to disseminate information is critical for business, science, education, government and the arts. Office suites are important tools that make the assembling, editing, redacting, formatting and sharing of knowledge efficient. KOffice and OpenOffice are open-source office suites that feature word-processing, database, spreadsheet, drawing and presentation applications. Both run on Windows and Linux operating systems and are free to download, use and share with others."

tswayne
Vote Up (11)

The only person I know that uses KOffice works at a small business that is all Linux, and he likes it.  That's not a very large sample or detailed review, I know.  I would probably stick with OpenOffice in a Windows environment, just because there is likely to be a very short learning curve, and I know that it won't screw up formatting when I save in different file formats.  But what the heck, download KOffice and give it a shot, like the earlier post suggested.  Maybe it is the greatest thing ever, and you can be in front of the crowd on adoption and down the road you can make smug comments like, "Oh, yeah, KOffice is great, I've been using it for years."  Or, if you don't like it, delete it.   

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
When not busy helping to find new treatments for cancer, IBM Watson is helping to cook up a few new dishes as well.
Oracle has failed to persuade a federal appeals court to restore US$1.3 billion judgment in its copyright-infringement lawsuit against SAP, but will have the options of taking a lesser amount of money or pursuing a new trial.
Thanks to the cloud, the “as a service” trend is getting a little out of control
IBM continues to make the case for the nascent field of cognitive computing, showing off some Watson prototypes Thursday that could help speed scientific discovery in the medical field, by scanning large volumes of literature and data far more quickly then humans can, and suggesting possible leads.
Three CIOs discuss how they balance traditional and unconventional approaches to keep projects on track and deliver on their promises.
Windows XP users may now download a fourth service pack for the 13-year-old operating system, but it isn't coming from Microsoft.
Wishing your Raspberry Pi had more power for all those hardware hacking projects you have planned? There's a new barebones board on the market that may better fit your needs, and right now you can sign-up for your chance to get it for free.
Is it crazy to pay $1300 for a Chromebook? Some reflections after a year and a half of living with Google's luxurious Pixel.
Project management seems so straightforward. You set a deadline. You set a budget. You select the right people. The project gets done.
The arrival of the first round Android Wear-based smartwatches means developers have to take extra care to ensure their apps look good.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

randomness