Which would be easier to transition to from Microsoft Office; OpenOffice or LibreOffice?

PapaRiver

I’ve been considering switching from MS Office to either LibreOffice or OpenOffice. Are there any major advantage to one of those over the other for someone transitioning from Office?

Topic: Software
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jimlynch
Vote Up (9)

I think LibreOffice is a better bet, it seems to be more widely supported these days than OpenOffice. You'll have a transition issues either way, but LibreOffice is more the future and OpenOffice is more the past. So I'd go with LibreOffice.

tswayne
Vote Up (7)

I don’t think the transition would be markedly more difficult for either, honestly. LibreOffice is actually a fork of OpenOffice, so they are more similar than different. Let’s face it, most office suites do the same basic functions, although it can take time to adjust to the quirks of the individual software. LibreOffice is not used as widely as OpenOffice, but most people agree that bug fixes and development is much quicker with LibreOffice.LibreOffice also has a smaller footprint than OpenOffice, which can be important with older machines.

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