How to recover data on a failed SSD?

tswayne

I know it is often possible to recover data from a failed HDD, but what about a SSD? If it fails, can data be recovered or are you out of luck?

Topic: Storage
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Answers

4 total
gregorythomasss
Vote Up (14)

I think you must know the differences between the HDD and SSD. But in my opinions, no matter HDD or SSD, if it is failed, the frist thing you need to do is to take it to the repair shop. After it is repaired, you can start to find ways to recover the data.

The important thing is that after the drive is repaired, you'd better not put anything new into it. If you put things into this drive, the data overwritten will be caused and you will lose the chances of data recovery. Perhaps this post may offer you more helps: http://www.uflysoft.com/data-recovery-mac/mac-files-recovery.html

jimlynch
Vote Up (10)

How to Recover Data on HDD, SSD and Flash-Based Memory
http://www.cio.com/article/print/727126

"Below are facts about recovering data from failed data storage drives in laptops and desktops, including tips for users who want to recover accidentally deleted data themselves. While the primary focus is recovering data from a hard disk drive (HDD), we also look increasingly popular Flash-based, solid-state drive (SSD) storage."

Daniel-Eaton
Vote Up (8)

Apparently! It is possible by an expert, don't take any risk by own.

riffin
Vote Up (8)

Data recovery is more difficult with SSDs. There are a lot of different proprietary controllers and built-in encryption, so what works on one SSD, may not work on another. I wouldn’t say it is impossible, but you are probably going to have to send it out to a data recovery company have them evaluate it. This is one downside of SSDs, but at least they have lower failure rates than HDDs. 

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