How can I get Android notifications on my PC?

jack12

Someone told me that there was a way to set up push notifications on your PC so you don't have to constantly pull out your Android when you are sitting at your desk and get a message alert. Kind of like how you get notifications on your phone, but in reverse. Any idea how to do this?

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wstark
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If you use a Chrome browser on your computer, you can add apps from the chrome web store for Google Voice, Google+, Evernote, etc. that will display an icon in the Chrome task bar.  Just now the little icon for Google Talk just indicated I have a new voice mail within one second of my phone chirping, so it gives real time notifications.  This only works if you use those services, obviously, so you couldn't do that if you use the native messaging on your phone instead of Talk.  

 

DeskNotifier, the program that Justin suggested, would be good if you used non-Google apps and services more than I do.  I think that you can set it up for use without a USB cable too, for those times when your skinny jeans make carrying one around impractical. 

jimlynch
Vote Up (19)

This article might be useful.

How To Receive Android Notifications On Your PC
http://www.redmondpie.com/how-to-receive-android-notifications-on-your-pc/

"Most of you will have been in a situation whereby you’re on a desktop or notebook, and after a while, realize you’ve missed a couple of notifications from your smartphone. Whether you’re just browsing the web due to boredom or working hard researching on a college assignment, it’s one of the few occasions where the reliability on a portable device is somewhat minimized.

Still, as somebody who spends a lot of time at the desk covering the latest in breaking tech news, I frequently miss some important updates on my device, but DeskNotifier for Android could be a saving grace to myself and others in a similar position. As the name implies, it allows Android notifications to be pushed through to the desktop, meaning if you’re completely distracted by your computer, it needn’t be a reason to be out of the loop with regards to your mobile device."

Justin Volzer
Vote Up (19)

Try this. You hook your phone up through USB and you can even send texts from the PC. Https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.elfsoft.desknotifier

Davide Non-Vattelapesca
Vote Up (0)

Hi, I'm Davide, a developer of a similar app called Pushline. We’d be glad if you will also try our solution. Visit our site http://www.getpushline.com, try it and help us build the best app. Thanks, Davide

Davide Non-Vattelapesca
Vote Up (0)

Hi, I'm Davide, a developer of a similar app called Pushline. We’d be glad if you will also try our solution. Visit our site http://www.getpushline.com, try it and help us build the best app. Thanks, Davide :)

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