How to make free VoIP calls on Android phones after May 15?

dvarian

I used to use GrooVeIP all the time to make calls over WiFi, but the app used Google Voice and apparently Google is implementing changes that will prevent it from working after May 15, 2014. It’s not that big of a deal for me, but one of my buddies is between jobs right now, and based on my recommendation he uses GrooVeIP as his only telephone. He probably couldn't even get a new cell contract at the moment without a job. Is there anything he can do to continue to use his Android phone for data and voice over WiFi without a contract after May 15?

Answer this Question

Answers

2 total
Number6
Vote Up (8)

Details are missing, but apparently they are either in talks with or have secured another service to keep VoIP service up. I’m glad, I have this app on my wifi only Android tablet, and while I don’t use it very often, it is handy when I don’t have my phone on me and need to make a quick call. Plus, there are a lot of people that have tight finances, and I love the fact that you can still have a functional phone without a contract with a cellular carrier. I hope other similar apps find a way to keep working too.

Here is the link to the GrooveIP app on Play. There is a comment near the top of the app description about the new VoIP service provider. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.gvoip

jimlynch
Vote Up (7)

Number 6 seems to have the best answer for this, good luck with it.

Ask a question

Join Now or Sign In to ask a question.
Twitter said late Tuesday it will remove images and videos of deceased people upon the request of family members, but it put conditions on the policy.
A tricked-out version of YouTube offering exclusive content might prove lucrative bait for Google to lure some of its users deeper into its digital video and music services.
Uber has hired David Plouffe, a former campaign manager for President Obama with deep ties to the White House, to help it enter new markets and bolster its fight against taxi competitors.
Sprint's got a new CEO and the company is getting serious about catching up to its rivals with a new family data sharing plan.
The U.S. Federal Communications Commission has the green light to collect new data on the pricing of so-called special access services, the middle-mile network services used to deliver business broadband and mobile service backhaul.
Nearly all of Facebook's outbound notification emails are now encrypted while traveling the Internet, a collaborative feat that comes from the technology industry's push to thwart the NSA's spying programs.
Microsoft has tweaked the controls in SharePoint Online to let administrators make better use of storage resources allocated to SharePoint websites.
Microsoft has developed a document management add-on for Office 365 intended for lawyers, signaling a possible interest by the company in creating vertical-industry tools for the suite.
Facebook is experimenting with a new feature that may help you determine that the story you saw is, in fact, an attempt at humor.
Harassment is all too common on Twitter. We have a few ideas the network can use to become a safer space.
randomness