How to send fax with Android phone or tablet?

ernard

Is it possible to send a fax from an Android phone to a traditional fax machine? If so, do you still have to pay to do it?

Tags: android, fax
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SarahStoke
Vote Up (8)

Hi,

 

Sfax have launched an app for Android

 

The mobile app is completely secure and HIPAA, GLBA and SOX compliant – adhering to the privacy rules for exchanging protected information.

 

The Sfax for Android app allows users to securely send, receive, and manage their faxing on an Android mobile device. For more information and to install the app please visit Google Play.

 

I hope this helps

dictat
Vote Up (4)

There are plenty of fax apps for mobile platphorms, i.e. for Android.

For example Popcompanion for AndroidThe app is available on Marketplace for free, and there is a free trial. Although if you need to send faxes from Android regularly or receive faxes to your personal fax number, of course this cannot be for free, because any good service is payable.

wstark
Vote Up (4)

Yes, there are a number of apps on Play, including FaxFile, eFax, iFax, FaxPro, etc. As far as I know, yes, you still do have to pay to send faxes still. I look forward to the day when we are finally free of the fax machine, but I guess that we aren’t quite there yet.

jimlynch
Vote Up (3)

How to Send a Fax Using Android
http://www.wikihow.com/Send-a-Fax-Using-Android

"To send a fax from a smartphone with Android OS is possible using an Internet fax service provider. Once an end-user have subscribed for an online fax service, he can log in to his account and start sending faxes. A smartphone with Android OS and an Internet connection is required. Thus, users can send and receive faxes from any place of the world."

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