How do I get my desktop icons back on Windows?

jluppino

My nephew was playing around with my laptop, and now my desktop is blank except for the start button on the lower right. I'm sure I'll smack my forehead when I learn how to fix this, but does anyone have an idea what he did and how to restore my desktop icons?

Topic: Windows
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jimlynch
Vote Up (14)

Here's an article that has a screenshot that illustrates how to restore your desktop icons in Windows 7.

Fix Missing Desktop Icons [Windows 7]
http://www.ghacks.net/2010/01/12/fix-missing-desktop-icons-windows-7/

"The missing desktop icons can however be displayed again easily. Some users might think that they have lost all of their desktop icons, they should however be visible in Windows Explorer for instance in the Desktop directory that is by default listed under Favorites in the left quick navigation menu in Windows Explorer.

The missing desktop icons can be displayed again by right-clicking the computer desktop and selecting View > Show Desktop Icons. They should appear immediately after making the change in the menu. A checkmark should be visible after selecting the entry."

kreiley
Vote Up (11)

Easy one, might want to get your forehead ready for a dope slap.  Right click on your icon free desktop, then check the option for display icons. Ta-da!  

Vote Up (6)

LOST OF ALL ICONS AND BAR FROM DESKTOP

 

If you are not able to see any icons and bar on your desktop, do 

 

not worry about it. Your windows is working fine.

Steps to resolve these issue are as follow:

 

- When you are on main screen or desktop of your PC & you are 

 

not able to see any icons and bar on your desktop.

 

- Press Ctrl+Alt+DELET, blue new windows will apear on your 

 

screen (In Win7) and click on open Task Manager. In windows XP 

 

task manager will appear once you will tab Ctrl+Alt+DELET. 

 

- Click on File Option in top left side of the Windows task manager.

- Select an New Task (Run...) option.

- Make the bar blank with the help of backspace key.

- Type In there "explorer.exe" and click on OK option.

- Your desktop will come on its own state.

- Then click on Processes option on Windows Task Manager.

- right click on explorer.exe & select and "Set Priority" option.

- Click on High.

- And click on positive option if its appear.

 

Your problem has been fixed.

 

If you want to send any feed back please feel free to mail me 

 

hendry.singh@gmail.com

Stephny Cook
Vote Up (6)

To turn the option back on , do this:

 

1. Right click the desktop

2. Select View -> Show Desktop Icon

3. Make sure the option is checked.

I hope this helps.

 

You can check here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2670504

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