Will printers that are compatible with Windows 7 also work with Windows 8?

jluppino

Looking at upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 8. Will printers that work with Windows 7 also work with Windows 8? I don't want to have to replace my printers along with the OS.

Topic: Windows
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jimlynch
Vote Up (22)

Most likely, but you should check your printer manufacturer's site for Windows 8 drivers. If the drivers are there, you're good to go.

dvarian
Vote Up (19)

Probably, but not 100% for sure. The newer the printer, the more likely a Windows 8 driver will be available.

Most printer manufacturers have a list of OS compatibility. Here are the links for Windows 8 compatibility OKI Data and Canon. I'm sure the other companies have something similar. 
http://www.okidata.com/mkt/downloads/Windows-8-Compatibility.pdf
http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/standard_display/windows

Christopher Nerney
Vote Up (19)

 

Based on this PCWorld article, you should be OK...

 

"Unlike the painful upgrade that many users experienced when moving from Windows XP to Vista, the move from Windows 7 to 8 should be much easier—at least that's what Microsoft is promising. Windows 8 will be backward-compatible with Windows 7, says Microsoft COO Kevin Turner. And PC manufacturers and device makers such as Canon, Epson, and Hewlett-Packard tell PCWorld that they've been working closely with Microsoft to ensure that gear 'just works' when plugged in."

 

...unless you're one of the unlucky ones...

 

"We combed through Microsoft's Compatibility Center for Windows 8 Release Preview database of known problems with printers, scanners, sound cards, webcams, keyboards, and mice. What we found on Microsoft's site was encouraging. Of the thousands of hardware devices listed there, only a handful of products were tagged as incompatible."

 

The three printers on the list are the Brother DCP-375CW, the Canon Pixma ip4000 and the HP Deskjet 2050.

 

 

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