Lay waste to your enemies with Dota 2 for Linux via Steam!

Today in Open Source: Dota 2 is now available for Steam on Linux. Plus: Wine 1.6 released, and how to install Unity alternatives in Ubuntu.

Dota 2 Released for Steam on Linux

Linux gamers should rejoice today, Dota 2 is now available via Steam. Dota 2 is a game that combines action and strategy.

I'm delighted to see the release of this game. Valve has been doing amazing work in bringing games to Linux, and their efforts are starting to bear some delicious fruit.

Dota is a competitive game of action and strategy, played both professionally and casually by millions of passionate fans worldwide. Players pick from a pool of over a hundred heroes, forming two teams of five players. Radiant heroes then battle their Dire counterparts to control a gorgeous fantasy landscape, waging campaigns of cunning, stealth, and outright warfare.

Irresistably colorful on the surface, Dota is a game of infinite depth and complexity. Every hero has an array of skills and abilities that combine with the skills of their allies in unexpected ways, to ensure that no game is ever remotely alike.

Get a taste of the game that has enthralled millions.

More at Steam Store

Here's the official trailer:

If you're interested in playing Dota 2 in Linux, here's a list of system requirements:

OS: Ubuntu 12.04

Processor: Dual core from Intel or AMD at 2.8 GHz

Memory: 4 GB RAM

Graphics: nVidia GeForce 8600/9600GT, ATI/AMD Radeaon HD2600/3600 (Graphic Drivers: nVidia 310, AMD 12.11), OpenGL 2.1

Network: Broadband Internet connection

Hard Drive: 8 GB available space

Sound Card: OpenAL Compatible Sound Card

It's wonderful to see Linux gaming finally taking off like this, after all these years. Good things come to those who wait, and we've been waiting quite a while!

Wine 1.6 Released

I barked a little bit in an earlier article this week about Wine and Windows RT. Now Wine 1.6 is available. There have been quite a few changes, far too many for me to cover here, but you can read the Wine 1.6 release announcement for details.

The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 1.6

is now available. This release represents 16 months of development effort and around

10,000 individual changes.

More at Wine HQ

Here's a brief sample of some of the things that had changes:

User Interface

X11 Driver

Graphics

Text and Fonts

Input Devices

Kernel

.NET Support

OLE/COM

Internet/Networking

Direct3D

DirectDraw

Audio and Video

Printer Support

Internationalization

Built-in Applications

Wine 1.6 will be welcomed by Wine users.

How to Install Xubuntu, Kubuntu or Lubuntu in Ubuntu 13.04

If you like Ubuntu but hate Unity, Linux.com has an article that will shows you how to install Xubuntu, Kubuntu or Lubuntu in Ubuntu 13.04.

Each of these desktops has its pluses and minuses. Personally, I'd opt for Xubuntu or Lubuntu as KDE has never really floated my boat. But your mileage may vary.

That, of course, is almost embarrassingly easy, since relief from the oddly-structured constraints that Unity imposes on your work habits is only an apt-get install away.

Do you like an extra-light desktop? Use

apt-get install lubuntu-desktop

Love wobbly windows and a transparent cube with all six faces in use?

apt-get install kubuntu-desktop.

Something between those extremes, just clean and powerful?

apt-get install xubuntu-desktop.

On your part, all you are required to do is twiddle your thumbs while the necessary packages are downloaded and installed, and when it's done you can log in to a very different experience than Unity offered you.

More at Linux.com

Of course you could also give Linux Mint a try. Linux Mint Debian edition is probably my favorite desktop distro. I did a full review of the latest version of it for Desktop Linux Reviews. So that might be a good alternative if the desktops listed above don't interest you, and you want to skip Ubuntu altogether.

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