Nokia takes on Apple and Samsung with clip of Lumia 928's low-light video capabilities

The upcoming device will have an 8.7-megapixel camera with optical image stabilization

Nokia has posted a video comparing the camera on the Lumia 928 with the Galaxy S III and the iPhone 5, as it gets ready to launch the phone.

The Lumia 928 will be an upgraded version of the existing flagship Lumia 920, and is expected to become available via U.S. operator Verizon Wireless. The Windows Phone-based device will have an 8.7-megapixel camera with optical image stabilization, according to Nokia.

As it tries to build some buzz for the phone, Nokia has updated the device's U.S. website with a clip that compares its video capabilities with that of the Galaxy S III from Samsung Electronics and Apple's iPhone 5. The video shows a roller-coaster ride at night, and not surprisingly the Nokia device comes out on top, according to Nokia. It has better color saturation than the iPhone 5 and less video noise than the Galaxy S III as well as a sharper image focus compared to both phones, according to the Finnish vendor.

Comparisons posted by vendors should be taken with a pinch of salt, but the camera has long been one of Nokia's strengths, according to Roberta Cozza, research director at Gartner. It was surprising when Nokia didn't talk more about the Lumia 920's imaging capabilities when it was launched last year, but the company seems to have learned from that mistake, she said.

However, the ad doesn't elaborate on how the Lumia 928 is different from the Lumia 920. The latter also has an 8.7-megapixel camera with optical image stabilization. The Lumia 928 is reportedly thinner and lighter than the Lumia 920, but it is difficult to tell from the images of the phone Nokia has posted.

Next week on May 14, Nokia will host a launch event in London where "the next chapter of the Lumia story" will be told. It now looks likely that the Lumia 928 will be launched there, for the local market and for other parts of the world including the U.S.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com

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