The challenges of disaster recovery as a service

Backing up your data and running your systems in the cloud is attractive -- but likely to fail if you don't treat it like a physical warm-site backup

By now, just about everyone is familiar with cloud-based backup services. Whether you're using simple file-based software tools or more complex image-based appliances, these services ship your data into secure cloud storage where it can be accessed at a moment's notice.

If you encounter a minor disaster (such as corrupted data), you simply download the affected files to your premises and get back to business. If you have a more severe sitewide disaster, you might need to source replacements to your on-premise server gear before you can do the restore. In both cases, online backup is in many ways similar to a traditional tape backup rotation that includes offsite tape storage -- except without the hassle of tapes.

Disaster recover as a service, or DRaaS, takes this concept a step further. Instead of just storing backups offsite where they can be restored to your premises, DRaaS offerings are coupled with cloud-based computing horsepower so that you can fire up your environment in the cloud as virtual machines, not just restore its data. DRaaS offers both offsite backup and a cloud-based warm site.

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This story, "The challenges of disaster recovery as a service" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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