Why putting your data center in Canada makes sense

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Case Study: Data Centers Go Underground

Canada's climate, political history and economic growth might be good reasons to put a data center there-but doing so means nothing if that's not where your business needs to be. However, if you do need to expand, the industry leaders interviewed for this article give no indication that you shouldn't consider locating a data center north of the border if that's where your customers are.

CloudFlare, a California-based cloud service provider focused on website security and performance, recently launched nine data centers in a 30-day period. One is in Toronto.

Matthew Prince, co-founder and CEO of CloudFlare, which has equipped 23 data centers, many in facilities previously used by telecom providers, in just three years.

Cloudfare co-founder and CEO Matthew Prince says the company routes traffic for hundreds of thousands of customers and constantly monitors the paths in the network between people who are visiting customer websites and its 23 data centers. (When traffic is up, of course, there is always a need for additional facilities.)

After a usage analysis, Cloudfare noticed it had a large number of users in Canada. Most were served from the company's Chicago data center, Prince says. With the addition of the Toronto facility, he says, CloudFlare can now route Canadian customers to those servers, saving milliseconds of load and wait times to on customers' websites.

Based in Nova Scotia, Canada, Vangie Beal has been covering small business, electronic commerce and Internet technology for more than a decade. You can tweet with her online @AuroraGG. Follow everything from CIO.com on Twitter @CIOonline, on Facebook, and on Google +.

Read more about energy efficiency in CIO's Energy Efficiency Drilldown.

This story, "Why putting your data center in Canada makes sense" was originally published by CIO.

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