Samsung not doing very well selling overpriced tablets

Here's a tale from the sad irony files.

Samsung's Hankil Yoon, a product strategy executive for the company, gets up in front of a media roundtable at Mobile World Congress and says "Honestly, we're not doing very well in the tablet market." [Source: Cnet]. Ouch.

The next day we get word that Samsung's Galaxy Tab 7.7 is hitting Verizon on March 1st for $500 with a two-year contract. Maybe Samsung needs a lesson on cause and effect.

In case you haven't updated your spreadsheet of Samsung Android devices (because how else could you keep track of them all?) the GalTab 7.7 is a 16GB LTE device with a dual-core, 1.4Ghz processor. The big selling point here is the Super AMOLED, 1280x800 screen.

I'm sure it's a great tablet but it's just too expensive and doesn't do enough to differentiate itself from the rest of the market.

Not that Samsung is the only company making this kind of mistake. We also learned yesterday that the Sony Tablet P is hitting AT&T on March 4th. That one will cost you $400 with a two year contract. The Tablet P is the 'clamshell' device with dual 5.5 inch screens, both 1024x480. It's got a mere 4GB of onboard storage but supports MicroSD cards up to 32 GB. Powering the thing is a dual core Tegra 2 1 Ghz processor.

At least Sony is bringing a unique form factor to the table (and a price $100 cheaper than the GalTab 7.7) but wow, if these companies want to get Android moving they really need to start dropping prices. They need to be undercutting the iPad line, not going toe-to-toe against it. To be fair, Sony is undercutting, but with a pair of 5.5 inch screens rather then a big bold 10" slab of a display.

Amazon understands this. Why is it so hard for other companies to grasp?

Read more of Peter Smith's TechnoFile blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Peter on Twitter at @pasmith. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

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