Video: Man flies 100m with self-made wings

Real-life Icarus takes off with wings, doesn't get too close to the sun

UPDATE: After several days of speculation by other sites and CGI experts, the creator admitted that these videos were fake. From MSNBC:

"Smeets, whose real name is Floris Kaayk, has come clean on Dutch television, admitting that his videos and accompanying blog were nothing more than what he calls "online storytelling." His flying video attracted more than 3 million views on YouTube."

Oh well, here's the original post I did when the world was innocent and we all enjoyed the video:

We've all seen the black-and-white footage of man's attempts to fly like the birds, and it was finally made easier when the Wright Brothers figured it out, but it was always more enjoyable to see the failure attempts, in which men strapped on birdlike wings and flapped like crazy, only to come crashing down quickly.

But now we have this guy: Jarno Smeets, a Dutch mechanical engineer who loves to mountain bike, kite and hang-glide. Smeets has developed a set of "human bird wings" and has blogged about his attempt to fly. Over the past weekend, he flew 100 meters, and filmed the whole thing:

Smeets has 13 other videos explaining the building process for the wings and other behind-the-scenes stuff, but watching him take off successfully is good enough for me. Where do I sign up for a pair?

One warning, though - as Icarus learned, don't get too close to the sun!

Just for fun, here are a bunch of YouTube clips showing early flight attempts (and crashes):

This one includes more sound and has more of a documentary feel, but is still hy-larious.

Keith Shaw rounds up the best in geek video in his ITworld.tv blog. Follow Keith on Twitter at @shawkeith. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

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