Even at $500 a share, Apple is not the most expensive tech stock

Personal technology giant reaches all-time share high, tops $500 for first time

Shares of Apple (NASDAQ: AAPL) crossed the $500 barrier for the first time Monday, finishing at 502.60. With shares inching up further early Tuesday to 505.23, Apple's stock could remain above 500 for awhile.

But even though Apple is the most valuable company in the world, with a market capitalization of $460 billion, it's not even the most expensive tech stock on a per-share basis.

That distinction goes to Google (NASDAQ: GOOG), which was trading early Tuesday at 608.00 after closing Monday at 612.20. The search giant's stock climbed as high as 670.25 in early January. Google currently is valued at $197 billion.

Hot on Google's heels is venerable discount travel site Priceline.com (NASDAQ: PCLN), which hit an all-time high of 588.56 in Tuesday morning trading after closing Monday at 571.15.

Which, of course, places Apple third. From there it's a big dropoff, though you won't be buying any single share of the companies below with change hidden in your sofa, unless you're one of these people (and even then, you're more likely to be stockpiling gold):

Shares of online retail giant Amazon.com (NASDAQ: AMZN) were at 193.57 early Tuesday.

IBM (NYSE: IBM), coming off an all-time high price of 194.90 last Thursday, was trading Tuesday at 192.60.

Shares of enterprise software player Salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM) were at 134.73 Tuesday, off the 52-week high of 160.12 set last July, but well above the 52-week low of 94.09 from late December.

F5 Networks (NASDAQ: FFIV), a maker of network appliances, saw shares trading Tuesday at 125.66, near the 52-week high of 127.81 set almost a year ago. (By the way, if you bought FFIV last August near its 52-week low of 69.01, you'd be closing to doubling your money.)

Business intelligence software vendor MicroStrategy (NASDAQ: MSTR) was trading Tuesday at 124.78, well below the 52-week high of 178.58 set last July.

Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) was trading Tuesday at 122.58, well below its all-time high of 304.79 set last summer before the rate-change fiasco sent shares as low as 62.37.

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