Yachts equals money equals data center downtime

If everyone in Munich had a dollar (or more) for data center downtime around the world, they could sail away

The amount of data that the world continues to amass will surely tip the scales of comparable computing power, yes? After all, Emerson Network Power, in its 2011 State of the Data Center infographic, says that by year’s end, humans will have created 1.2 trillion gigabytes (GB) of data, equivalent to 75 billion 16 GB iPods. And according to Emerson Network Power, a provider data center infrastructure management solutions, that’s more than enough for every person on earth to own 10 iPods.

Where will it all go? Is there enough infrastructure in place to handle all that? Are today’s data centers – the pillars of the Internet on which much of this data traverses – up to snuff? They better be, Emerson Network points out. After all, if all 509,147 data centers (with square footage equal to 5,955 football fields) went out 2.5 times (based on an average) for a duration of 134 minutes, that would equal 2,842,737 hours of downtime, at a total loss of $426 billion a year.

What could one do with those billions of dollars? Not pay off the U.S. government’s debt of course, but it’s enough at least to buy every person in Munich, Germany, a yacht, the company says.

Here are more fun facts illustrating just how busy and loaded the Internet is. Every second, 1,157 people start watching Youtube, which turns into the viewing of 100 million videos each day. One of my favorite fun facts: every hour enough information is consumed by Internet traffic to fill 7 million DVDs. Oh, and stack them side by side and they’d scale Mt. Everest 95 times. Ninety-five!

It’s a good thing then, Emerson Network Power points out in its infographic, that servers purchased in 2011 have on average 45 times more compute capacity than similarly configured servers installed in 2001. On that curve, who knows what we’ll see in a decade!

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