Microsoft finally shares its vision of the PC of the future, in video

Long story short: everything you touch and use will be smarter than you

Ok, it's actually hard to stop Microsoft from sharing its vision of the future. To the point that it became anti-competitive about it, according to some among the judicial set.

This morning it posted a bit of pro-technology schmaltz in the form of a six-minute video (and a press release describing the video) showing ) imagining what the PC will look like in five or 10 years and how widely computer technology will have spread.

The video is the next-generation of a similar vid Microsoft put out in 2008, when laptops were so heavy you could barely carry them through the airport and Windows would crash all the time

In Microsoft's vision of the future the PC won't look like anything, most of the time. The functions and intelligence of the PC will be built into eyeglasses, notepads, thin screens in taxis and flat surfaces where people gather will display their work, data or schedule updates.

Computers, in Microsoft's vision, will be divided into small units very unlike PCs and built into things we use all the time to make us more productive by making each thing we touch useful for more than one thing and make all the information we actually need available whenever and wherever we need it.

Geekwire advances the story by interviewing the the videomakers, but the only really interesting thing either has to say is the job title of the guy who heads the group that shot the video: Director of Envisioning.

The cinematography is a lot better than most other descriptions of exactly the same kinds of futuristic smart-object implementations of technology – like this one that I wrote in January and which I present as a way of showing everyone has had this vision, not that I beat Microsoft by writing it first.

Philip K. Dick wrote it first.

Read more of Kevin Fogarty's CoreIT blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Kevin on Twitter at @KevinFogarty. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

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