Microsoft kills Silverlight and other plug-ins in Windows 8

Wall to wall news about Windows 8 from Microsoft means we overlook some interesting details in the infodump. Potentially distressing? Dropping support for plugins in the Metro-based IE10. No Flash, no Silverlight, no PDF readers.

It appears Microsoft plans for HTML5 to do all the heavy lifting for Windows 8 and Internet Explorer. But has any operating system shipped configured exactly the way customers need it? Large companies spend thousands of hours setting and maintaining their corporate standards. Personalization of their computing experience seems a fundamental right to many users.

Could be the plan is for apps to take the place of plug-ins. Do you think you'll feel comfortable in 18 months downloading apps to your desktop to function the way you need? Or is this a plan to charge everyone $.99 tomorrow for what we get free with plug-ins today?

Much ado about nothing

MS dropping Flash is no surprise, considering they showed off their IDE and IE running HTML5 over a year ago.

ThePixelDoc on appleinsider.com

The headline is sensationalist and wrong. Think of it this way, Metro is their tablet/iPad mode. The iPad has no flash/silverlight in the browser, and neither does Metro IE. This in order to get the best tablet experience, battery life etc. The difference is, you can hit a button and open up full Windows desktop mode and get the full browsing experience, while accepting a tradeoff in battery life.

rodh257 on news.ycombinator.com

When the hell has the industry NOT followed Apple's lead, on anything? Apple is always mocked/ridiculous/insulted at first, but ultimately, wthether its months or years later, everyone follows suit.

Slurpy on appleinsider.com

Good idea

This is great news for consumers.

eksodos on sppleinsider.com

It's about the lack of extensible components in HTML itself. It's too limited of a control palette. We need a standardized way of extending it that is plugin-free.

matt mcknight on infoq.com

Apple doesn't allow plugins in their web browser. Microsoft is not allowing plugins in Metro. Flash on the web has existed for years, and not having plugins hurts end users because they experience the entire web. No plugins for something that doesn't exist yet hurts no one, because apps will be designed from the ground up without plugins. See the difference?

Giometrix on news.ycombinator.com

And they said Apple's Steve Jobs was wrong...when he jettisoned Flash..? Just like they said he was wrong about tablet form factor.

nkalu on appleinsider.com

New world of Windows 8

In the new OS world, Web pages run in a browser, Web applications (Silverlight et al.) run in the Metro experience, and Desktop applications run in the Desktop experience (including classic web browsing). Silverlight is dead? Hah! Metro is the new browser.

Rod Hughes on infoq.com

When you find companies dropping a particular technology for something else, its just that they figure out a better bait to catch more fish.

kamaal on news.ycombinator.com

I think the issue people have is that in the last decade (roughly), Microsoft has been releasing technological stacks in great fanfare, promoting them as the be-end end-all of everything and killing them on a 2~3 years cycle. WebForms, WPF, Silverlight, MDX, DWM/Aero seem deprecated by Metro, ... and I remember about a billion data-access frameworks which got the ax every 6 months or so.

masklinn on news.ycombinator.com

Is it silly we're so worried about what will happen when Windows 8 won't be available for at least a year? Or are you the plan-ahead type?

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