Which smartphones emit the most (and least) radiation?

Environmental Working Group ranks devices; Motorola dominates list (not in a good way)

Until cell phone users start dropping like flies, the World Health Organization's report that cell phone radiation is "possibly carcinogenic" isn't likely to make a dent in the popularity of the devices. They're just too useful.

Plus the WHO didn't ring a giant alarm bell. "Possibly carcinogenic," really, is pretty hedgy language.

(Also see: WHO warns of possible link between cell phone use, brain cancer risk)

All that being said, there's nothing wrong with consumers knowing exactly how much radiation their particular phones are emitting.

To that end, a non-profit research organization called the Environmental Working Group has compiled several lists ranking cell phones based on the watts per kilogram emanating from the devices.

You can see the full rankings by clicking on the links below:

All Smartphones

All Available Phones

All Phones (current and legacy)

One thing that will jump out at you is that the vast majority of devices emitting the most radiation are manufactured by Motorola.

Of 94 phones in the "All Phones" category that give off at least 1.50 w/kg, 68 are Motorola handsets.

Of the 10 smartphones that meet or exceed that radiation level, Motorola makes seven, including AT&T's Bravo (No. 1 with 1.59 w/kg) and the Verizon Droid 2 Global (1.58 w/kg)

(By the way, I own a Verizon Droid 2, which emits 1.50 w/kg of radiation. I'm not alarmed, but I can't say I like it. When I buy my next smartphone, I will consider these numbers.)

The smartphone giving off the lowest amount of radiation, by far, is AT&T's LG Quantum (0.35 w/kg), followed by Verizon's Samsung Fascinate and CellularONE and U.S. Cellular's Samsung Mesmerize (both 0.57)

As for the iPhones, they range from 1.03 w/kg (AT&T's 3G model) to 1.19 w/kg (AT&T's 3G S model). Not sure why the Verizon iPhone isn't on the list, but its numbers likely are comparable.

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