At EEE, will Sony admit 'Crack my Network' has become its most popular game?

Like 'Dunk the Clown,' but you crack a web site instead of hitting a target with a ball

Do you think online security is going to be a top at Electronic Entertainment Expo (EEE), the annual videogame-industry yak-fest that opens tomorrow morning in Los Angeles?

After Sony got hacked so hard and so often the original attackers had to stop for a rest and pass the reins to replacement players? After Nintendo was cracked once, but didn't lose any customer data, compared to the more than 100 million accounts that slipped out Sony's doors?

After LulzSec, the group that embarrassed Sony last week did it again by posting what it said is the source code for Sony Computer Entertainment's Developer Network this morning?

LulzSec is a public-spirited group that exposed Sony as (ahem) overoptimistic for swearing publicly it had fixed its security problems, just before LulzSec cracked Sony Pictures Entertainment using the same exploit as the other attacks, stealing 100,000 unencrypted customer usernames and passwords and posting them online.

On its Twitter feed, the group implied without admitting that it is responsible for the earliest Sony attacks as well as Nintendo, and that it decided to be merciful by limiting the attack because "we like the [Nintendo 64] too much – we sincerely hope Nintendo plugs the [security] gap," members of the group tweeted.

"We love Nintendo and Sega, if anything we'd hack *for* them," they continued later. "If you're listening Nintendo/Sega, you, you uh... you want Sony hacked more?"

LulzSec also linked to this list, posted at Attrition.org, of the attacks on various Sony properties, the probably attackers, and links to stories and press releases describing Sony's flailing responses.

Given that the game LulzSec refers to as "Hackers vs. Sony" seems to be its most popular right now, Sony might do better to forget about Playstation games and figure out how to monetize that one.

The hackers who stole much of its customer data already have.

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