LTE in 2011: Curb your enthusiasm

So now that both Verizon and AT&T are launching LTE services this year, you should rush out to invest in 4G data plans and devices for your employees, right?

Not so fast.

[ See also: 4G mobile broadband and you: Coverage, cost, and, yes, caveats ]

LTE - which stands for Long Term Evolution - is a GSM-based wireless data standard that has been adopted by Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile as their choice for 4G wireless technology. So far, tests of commercially deployed LTE technology have shown it can deliver average download speeds in the 7M to 12Mbps range, although these speeds are likely to decline once more users subscribe to the services. Along with mobile WiMAX, LTE is part of a new breed of wireless technology that aims to give users a wireless Internet experience that matches or exceeds the speed of most wireline broadband connections.

To continue reading, register here and become an Insider. You'll get free access to premium content from CIO, Computerworld, CSO, InfoWorld, and Network World. See more Insider content or sign in.

This story, "LTE in 2011: Curb your enthusiasm" was originally published by Network World.

What’s wrong? The new clean desk test
Join the discussion
Be the first to comment on this article. Our Commenting Policies