Yahoo sneaks in some more layoffs ahead of earnings

Internet company letting go 100 to 150 employees just weeks after larger round of cuts

Speak of the Yahoo layoff devil. Just an hour ago I posted a blog about Yahoo's pending earnings results, which will be announced after Tuesday's market close, in which I made this comment: (Also see: Note to Yahoo: Layoffs aren't a turnaround strategy) Part of the problem for Yahoo, of course, is that it no longer has a strong identity, other than as a company from which you can expect a big round of layoffs every year or so. Now it appears Yahoo has accelerated to a monthly layoff schedule. The company announced Tuesday it will terminate the employment of 1 percent of its workforce, or 100 to 150 people. This is after a massive round of layoffs in mid-December (happy holidays!), when Yahoo gave pink slips to 650 to 700 employees. When the company announced the layoffs in December, it at least pretended to be sorry, as well as appreciative of the efforts of the laid-off workers, saying, "Yahoo is grateful for the important contributions made by the employees affected by this reduction." Now it doesn't even bother with that. Here's today's statement: The personnel changes we are making are part of our ongoing strategy to best position Yahoo! for revenue growth and margin expansion and to support our strategy to deliver differentiated products and experiences to the marketplace. We’ll continue to hire on a global basis to support our key priorities. Today’s action impacts approximately 1% of the global employee base. Weasel-words alert: They're not "personnel changes," Yahoo. They're layoffs. So do the layoffs portend good or bad news regarding fourth-quarter results? We'll know in a couple of hours, but at this point I'm sure not expecting an upside surprise. And if the company does turn in some good numbers, the now-jobless workers no doubt will be thrilled.

Chris Nerney writes about the business side of technology market strategies and trends, legal issues, leadership changes, mergers, venture capital, IPOs and technology stocks. Follow him on Twitter @ChrisNerney.

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